inside job, the documentary about what happened in the ‘financial crisis’ in 2008- what an important film. you can watch it in full HD quality for free.

and there are still new insights as to what happened exactly, as some recently revealed FED documents show.

The Fed didn’t tell anyone which banks were in trouble so deep they required a combined $1.2 trillion on Dec. 5, 2008, their single neediest day. Bankers didn’t mention that they took tens of billions of dollars in emergency loans at the same time they were assuring investors their firms were healthy. And no one calculated until now that banks reaped an estimated $13 billion of income by taking advantage of the Fed’s below-market rates.

The amount of money the central bank [‘the FED’] parceled out […] dwarfed the Treasury Department’s better-known $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP. Add up guarantees and lending limits, and the Fed had committed $7.77 trillion as of March 2009 to rescuing the financial system, more than half the value of everything produced in the U.S. that year.

i’ve certainly never heard about them before..

on the topic of transparency, this is a well-made video for makeaidtransparent.org.
they have a petition calling for more governments to report their aid information according to international standards so they are actually useful.

influence explorer is an eye-opening transparency project that visualizes data from e.g. the project on government oversight. you can type in any company, (U.S.) politician, or prominent individual to find out more about their influence on the political system.
the other products also seem to have potential: inbox influence shows you the political contributions of the people that influence your inbox, and checking influence does the same thing using your bank account (i do have some privacy concerns before using it, will look into that).
anybody want to set this up for germany and europe?

influence explorer is an eye-opening transparency project that visualizes data from e.g. the project on government oversight. you can type in any company, (U.S.) politician, or prominent individual to find out more about their influence on the political system.

the other products also seem to have potential: inbox influence shows you the political contributions of the people that influence your inbox, and checking influence does the same thing using your bank account (i do have some privacy concerns before using it, will look into that).

anybody want to set this up for germany and europe?